Meet Jeff

Jeff, and Newco Chimney Tradition, have been in business in Long Island for over 30 years. Jeff specializes in:

- Chimney Building
- Stainless Liners
- Chimney Caps
- Brick work
- Masonry Work
- Fireplaces
- Chimney Cleaning
- Chimney Inspections

Fire Fire prevention week is coming up soon. According to the National Fire Protection Associate, fire prevention week is October 7-13th. Be sure to get your chimney checked in honor fire prevention week!
 
carbon-monoxide

The dangers of CO exposure depend on a number of variables, including the victim’s health and activity level. Infants, pregnant women, and people with physical conditions that limit their body’s ability to use oxygen (i.e. emphysema, asthma, heart disease) can be more severely affected by lower concentrations of CO than healthy adults would be.

A person can be poisoned by a small amount of CO over a longer period of time or by a large amount of CO over a shorter amount of time.

In 2010,U.S.fire departments responded to an estimated 80,100 non-fire CO incidents in which carbon monoxide was found, or an average of nine such calls per hour.  The number of incidents increased 96 percent from 40,900 incidents reported in 2003. This increase is most likely due to the increased use of CO detectors, which alert people to the presence of CO.

 

Source: Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Incidents,” by Ben Evarts, March 2012

 
European chimney

Many American homeowners think their chimneys only need to be cleaned and inspected if they burn wood in their fireplaces or wood stoves. But almost all heating appliances, whether they burn gas, oil, wood or coal, rely on the chimney to safely carry toxic gases produced by the heating system of the house.

A carbon monoxide detector can warn homeowners of potential poisoning after the deadly gas has already entered the living area, but an annual chimney check can help prevent carbon monoxide from entering the home in the first place.

Each fall, homeowners shift into home-improvement mode. They clean gutters, garages and basements — preparing homes for winter. But they usually don’t inspect, repair or clean their chimneys, despite the potential for damage to their property or even to their lives.

An annual chimney inspection by a CSIA Certified Chimney Sweep® is a modest investment that can reduce the danger of chimney fires or carbon monoxide poisoning. CSIA Certified Chimney Sweeps have earned the industry’s most respected credential by passing an intensive examination based on fire codes, clearances and standards for the construction and maintenance of chimneys and venting systems.

In fact, when chimney fires occur, many insurance investigators rely on CSIA Certified Chimney Sweeps to determine whether a fire originated in – or damaged – the chimney system. The CSIA, established in 1983, is a non-profit, educational institution, dedicated to educating the public about the prevention of chimney safety hazards.

-Info taken from CSIA.org website

falling-bricks

Due to a recent fatal Connecticut home fire apparently caused by discarded live embers, the Chimney Safety Institute of America issues reminders on fireplace safety:

1. Get an annual chimney check. Have chimneys inspected annually, and cleaned as necessary, by a qualified professional chimney service technician. This reduces the risk of fires and carbon monoxide poisonings due to creosote buildup or obstructions in the chimneys.

2. Keep it clear. Keep tree branches and leaves at least 15 feet away from the top of the chimney.

3. Install a chimney cap to keep debris and animals out of the chimney.

4. Choose the right fuel. For burning firewood in wood stoves or fireplaces, choose well-seasoned wood that has been split for a minimum of six months – one year and stored in a covered and elevated location. Never burn Christmas trees, treated wood or wrapping paper in your fireplace or wood stove.

5. Build it right. Place firewood or fire logs at the rear of the fireplace on a supporting grate. To start the fire, use kindling or a commercial firelighter. Never use flammable liquids.

6. Keep the hearth area clear. Combustible material too close to the fireplace, or to a wood stove, could easily catch fire. Keep furniture at least 36” away from the hearth.

7. Use a fireplace screen. Use metal mesh or a screen in front of the fireplace to catch flying sparks that could ignite or burn holes in the carpet or flooring.

8. Install smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. Place detectors throughout the house and check batteries in the spring and fall. When you change your clocks for Daylight Savings Time, remember to check your batteries.

9. Never leave a fire unattended. Before turning in for the evening, be sure that the fire is fully extinguished. Supervise children and pets closely around wood stoves and fireplaces.

10. Discard ashes in a closed metal container and place it away from the house until they have fully cooled.

The CSIA recommends annual inspections performed by CSIA Certified Chimney Sweeps. These chimney sweeps have earned the industry’s most respected credential by passing an intensive examination based on fire codes, clearances and standards for the construction and maintenance of chimney and venting systems. The National Fire Protection Association also recommends that all chimneys are inspected on an annual basis. For more information about chimney and venting safety or to locate a CSIA Certified Chimney Sweep® or CSIA Certified Dryer Exhaust Technician®, visit www.csia.org.


The Chimney Safety Institute of America is a non-profit, educational organization dedicated to chimney and venting system safety. CSIA is committed to the elimination of residential chimney fires, carbon monoxide intrusion and other chimney-related hazards that result in the loss of lives and property. To achieve these goals, CSIA devotes its resources to educating the public, chimney and venting professionals and other fire prevention specialists about the prevention and correction of chimney and venting system hazards.

 
Smoke Alarms

Ninety-six percent of all homes have at least one smoke alarm, according to a 2010 telephone survey. Overall, three-quarters of all U.S.homes have at least one working smoke alarm.

Almost two-thirds of home fire deaths in 2005-2009 resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.

When smoke alarms fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are missing, disconnected or dead.  Almost one-quarter of the smoke alarm failures was due to dead batteries.

 

Source: NFPA’s “Smoke Alarms in U.S. Home Fires”, by Marty Ahrens, September 2011

 

Just because a chimney business has certifications, it doesnt mean the person working on your chimney does. With Newco, the certified owner does every bit of the work!

Jeff and Newco Chimney Tradition have been serving Long Island since 1983. Jeff grew up in Long Island and wants to make sure this city stays just as nice as it always has been! Be sure to contact Jeff and Newco Chimney Tradition for all your Chimney needs.

Contact Info

  • Newco Chimney Tradition
  • 179 Kingston Blvd.
  • Island Park, NY 11558
  • Tel: (631) 374-0999

About Newco

  • Just because a chimney business has certifications, it doesnt mean the person working on your chimney does. With Newco, the certified owner does every bit of the work!